Barnwood and Beachwood staining tutorial

Barnwood and Beachwood are pretty popular these days. You can find furniture and other home goods with these finishes just about everywhere. When I first saw this look surface, I was trying to think of a way to recreate it. I ended up stumbling upon this method by accident and then eventually refining it.

Here is what you’ll need:

Rust-oleum small stain jars. Driftwood, Kona and Weathered Gray.

Rust-oleum small stain jars. Driftwood, Kona and Weathered Gray.

You’ll also need a stain brush, paper towels, some light grit sand paper and a bare wood surface.

This method is so easy, that I don’t even need to really include pictures of the process because it’s fairly straight forward and there isn’t really a wrong way to do it.

I start with the Weathered Gray stain and cover my piece then rub it in well with a paper towel.

Next I make some random brush strokes over the surface with the Kona color. Some of these I rub in, and others I keep the brush marks more obvious.

Finally, I do some light random strokes with the Driftwood stain and do not rub these in. I want it to almost appear like lighter wood grains.

And lastly, after the stain has dried, I sand my piece almost like I would if I were distressing a painted piece.

Here are some pictures of some pieces I have used this technique on:

photo-(1)

 

I made the shelf have a barnwood feel.

photo-(2)

 

The shutters now have a nice rustic vibe. They were originally pine.

photo-(4)

This shelf was oak. I only used Driftwood and Kona for this piece to make it feel more beachy. Forego the Weathered Gray if you want more of a Beachwood look and start with Driftwood then rub in some Kona to make the color more rich.

photoThis was a wood frame I sanded and stained with the barnwood look.

I want to add that you can’t really go wrong with this method. Just play around and use your sand paper if you need to soften any areas. But most of all have fun!